Localism in American Life

Allied Farmers, Small Businesses, and Woodrow Wilson: The Early Days of Economic Localism – This is the second chapter of a work in progress currently titled Anti-Chain Store to Small Mart Revolution: Economic Localism in Modern America for publication by Blooming Twig Books in late 2017 or 2018. It will be the first of a multi-volume series to be called Localism in American Life.

Allied Farmers Small Businesses and Woodrow Wilson The Early Days of Economic Localism

AandP store
Sign in national chain store, Taylor, Texas Photographer Lee, Russell Date: 1939

In 1924 a booklet appeared with the ominous title The Menace of the Chain Store. Little longer than a short story, anonymous, and published not by a major house, but by an Indianapolis ad agency The Millis Advertising Company, The Menace of the Chains started with the assertion that chain stores were here to stay. From there the writer assumed that a menace actually existed and moved quickly to a self-serving solution. The answer was aggressive advertising by the brands so that consumers would demand them despite higher prices than the chains’ discount private brands.

Caswell County NC AandP 8c13720r
Signs on chain store window welcoming farmers to town during tobacco auction sale time Caswell County NC Contributor: Wolcott, Marion Post Date: 1940

The Menace of the Chains 1924

The link below takes one to an early draft of a now shelved first chapter of a book I called Localism in American Life. I have since refocused my approach, projecting a multi-volume work. Still, the chapter gives a good overview of how I looked a localist history in early 2015.

Localism in American Life Chapter One

Big Chain Store Schreveport LA

Big Chain Store Schreveport LA photos

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